Late last week, the city of Worthington was awarded the bid for next year’s Governor’s Pheasant Hunting Opener.

That is great news. It will be a huge event for Worthington, Nobles County and southwest Minnesota.

But now what?

From an outdoor perspective, Daily Globe outdoor columnist Scott Rall explains those next steps in this week’s column.

However, that’s just part of it.

“Our next step is we schedule a meeting with our group of individuals we got together to see if we could even carry this forward,” said Worthington Area Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Darlene Macklin. “We’re going to be meeting within two weeks to form our committee and start planning things.”

This will include meetings with people from Explore Minnesota.

“John Edman, Explore Minnesota Commissioner, wants to come down here with a staff person to help us work out the details at one of our very first meetings,” Macklin said.

That meeting will happen in the next few weeks.

And while this will bring good exposure for the community, it also comes with a cost.

“We know Montevideo and Marshall spent somewhere around $25,000,” Macklin said.

Most of that cost will be offset by sponsors for the event.

“I think it will be a lot of fun,” Macklin said.

With Gov. Mark Dayton coming to Worthington, it makes sense he stays in the Dayton House, right?

“I hope he will,” Macklin said, who added reservations have already been made. “I think he would because he made reference to that when he gave the announcement.”

To be honest, the toughest part might be finding pheasants for everybody to shoot.
“I know,” Macklin said. “That’s what people were saying. That is going to be tough.”
The event center is also booked for the pre-hunt banquet.
“I booked that right away on Saturday,” Macklin said. “I thought on the way home on Friday night, oh my, what if there is a wedding there?

The date of the hunt is Oct. 10-11 of 2014.

“Next year we are going to have the nationals at Regatta, 75th anniversary or Turkey Day and now the governor’s pheasant opener,” Macklin said.

That’s a lot to handle for the chamber of commerce.

“We can do it with good volunteers,” she said.